Don’t Minimize Memory Loss Or Those “Senior Moments”

When is forgetfulness a sign of something serious? When it begins to interfere in your life on a daily basis, memory loss could be serious.

I know.

Memory loss can be scary.

 

As we get older it’s common to experience slips in our memory. It’s part of the aging process that begins around 40. We forget where we put our keys or our glasses or the checkbook. We stand in the store and realize we forgot the grocery list at home.  We forget where we parked the car and can’t remember so-and-so’s name. Typically we chuckle over these lapses of memory and refer to them as senior moments or brain freeze.

But forgetfulness or memory loss becomes a possible impairment if you:
–Struggle to find the right word to use when chatting like it’s on the tip of your tongue.
–Can’t remember a conversation.
–Lose your train of thought.
–Find it’s a struggle to get organized.
–Lose your ability to focus on tasks.
–Notice a change in your thinking.

The key issue is whether cognitive changes are significantly interfering with daily activities,” says Kirk R. Daffner, M.D., Chief of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “If that’s happening, you should consult your doctor. Your memory lapses may well have very treatable causes. Severe stress, depression, a vitamin B12 deficiency, insufficient sleep, some prescription drugs and infections can all play a role.”

I recently underwent some tests because I noticed changes in my memory last year. The outcome? My Parkinsonism got an upgrade–Mild Neurocognitive Disorder suggestive of a Parkinson’s Plus Disorder.

There are steps I take every day to minimize the possible progression of this memory impairment that could develop into dementia.

If your memory lapses are happening more frequently, I encourage you to consult with your doctor.

Think about it.

drsandynelson@gmail.com, © Life101Blog.com, Sandy Nelson Ph.D., All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

When Did You Last Hear “Take Your Time?”

We are all ruled by time. It controls our daily lives. 

Do we ever have enough time?

Time is attached to all events—births, meetings, flights, dinner, classes, family visits, accidents, celebrations, weddings, and deaths.

Time changes the seasons. It ages all life and awakens the new.

Time. It’s a priority—so be on time. We give it honor—we thank you for this time. We curse it—what’s taking so long? It deceives us—we think we have more time. We live it one day at a time.

Time. A commodity that cannot be ruled or bought or threatened or bargained. It cannot be stolen, bribed, or tortured. It holds no bias. It passes with no thought of our peril.

It’s both a mentor and a master. It’s a lifetime.

Free time has a price. This minute becomes history in 60 seconds, never to be revived. It’s opportunities vanish. Another delay in a pursuit of dreams. Maybe another missed chance. Are we waiting for time?

Don’t say you don’t have enough time. You have exactly the same number of hours per day that were given to Helen Keller, Pasteur, Michaelangelo, Mother Teresa, Leonardo da Vinci, Thomas Jefferson, and Albert Einstein. –H. Jackson Brown Jr.

We can feel validation when we mark our time with worthwhile moments. Stop waiting, stop postponing. Reach for that destiny. Make a plan. It’s worth the time.

Make the choice to be mindful of every minute spent with family and friends. Take time. Be present. Remember the details. With each passing day, children and family are older.

The pressure of time is stress.

Things need to be done by a certain time. Maybe a lot of things need attention after a workday. Take it from a recovering perfectionist, not everything is urgent. Some things can wait, if not many.

Discovering and maintaining relationships is probably the best use of time. The ones that are supportive and understanding. The ones whom will rally when needed. Nurture those relationships. Be a friend, too.

Use some time running interference with your purpose in life–what you feel driven to accomplish. There will be obstacles. Some people won’t understand and won’t be supportive and won’t get it. That’s okay. Sometimes illness or something else happens that threatens to derail your calling. A genuine passion for something will not budge regardless of events.

Helping or inspiring other people is always a good use of time. This is a blessed time to give humanity. To contribute to something bigger than one person.  It steadies the belief that mankind is compassionate, capable, and helpful.

The trouble is, you think you have time. -Buddha

Think about it.

drsandynelson@gmail.com ♦ Life101Blog.com©

Who Mindfully Lives Each Day?

The author of seven adventurous Star Trek novels, Margaret Bonnano penned: It is only possible to live happily ever after on a day-to-day basis.

But can we really live that way?

Every day moves at a blast-off pace brimming with work, appointments, children, errands, obligations, and more. We’re not slowing down. We’re accelerating.

When the term multi-tasking entered our culture, the more efficiently we could perform three or more tasks in sync, the more valuable we became to employers, family and friends. Just like circus performers spinning several plates up on poles, we’ve come to expect ourselves to manage concurrent tasks effectively.

That’s stress!

How do we live one day at a time with all our plates spinning in a world traveling 1000 mph per second?

I would like to live mindfully one day at a time—to only be focused on the day that I’m living.

My mind, however, tends to fret about what might happen tomorrow and I get stuck over-thinking about stuff that occurred yesterday, last week, and last year.

Former New York Senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan once said: Life is one day at a time. And thank God! I couldn’t take much more.

That sounds like someone who was accustomed to spinning plates every day. Someone who tried to keep yesterday and tomorrow in check while managing today. That sure describes me, how about you?

There’s enough to sort through, solve, organize, and workout in one day. Adding worry about tomorrow and second-guessing yesterday isn’t a good use of time and energy.

So I try to practice Mindfulness.

Now wait, before any eye rolling or scrutiny that you have no time for meditation, consider this—mindfulness in its simple form is merely the art of self-awareness. It’s a state of being aware of your thoughts and feelings in your surroundings.

I try to stop several times throughout every day and remind myself to take in the moment. I stay mindfully aware of my thoughts and self-talk and make it a point to kick negativity to the curb.

I’ve customized the practice of mindfulness to what works for me. I do not sit on a yoga mat in the Burmese or Full Lotus position.

But every evening, in quiet, I sit in a recliner with my feet on the floor. I shut my eyes and mindfully focus on my breathing. I envision a calm and healing energy going to my mind and body with every inhale of breath. When I exhale, I imagine all frustration and worrisome thoughts leaving my mind and body. After a minute or two, I focus my attention to gratitude for the blessings in my life. In about ten minutes, I’m done. I feel more physically relaxed and my mind is calm.

Mindfulness has been found to have considerable health benefits. It’s like a wonder drug that isn’t a pharmaceutical.

Think about it.

Dr. Sandy Nelson

Dr. Sandy Nelson

 

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