Don’t Minimize Memory Loss Or Those “Senior Moments”

When is forgetfulness a sign of something serious? When it begins to interfere in your life on a daily basis, memory loss could be serious.

I know.

Memory loss can be scary.

 

As we get older it’s common to experience slips in our memory. It’s part of the aging process that begins around 40. We forget where we put our keys or our glasses or the checkbook. We stand in the store and realize we forgot the grocery list at home.  We forget where we parked the car and can’t remember so-and-so’s name. Typically we chuckle over these lapses of memory and refer to them as senior moments or brain freeze.

But forgetfulness or memory loss becomes a possible impairment if you:
–Struggle to find the right word to use when chatting like it’s on the tip of your tongue.
–Can’t remember a conversation.
–Lose your train of thought.
–Find it’s a struggle to get organized.
–Lose your ability to focus on tasks.
–Notice a change in your thinking.

The key issue is whether cognitive changes are significantly interfering with daily activities,” says Kirk R. Daffner, M.D., Chief of Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “If that’s happening, you should consult your doctor. Your memory lapses may well have very treatable causes. Severe stress, depression, a vitamin B12 deficiency, insufficient sleep, some prescription drugs and infections can all play a role.”

I recently underwent some tests because I noticed changes in my memory last year. The outcome? My Parkinsonism got an upgrade–Mild Neurocognitive Disorder suggestive of a Parkinson’s Plus Disorder.

There are steps I take every day to minimize the possible progression of this memory impairment that could develop into dementia.

If your memory lapses are happening more frequently, I encourage you to consult with your doctor.

Think about it.

drsandynelson@gmail.com, © Life101Blog.com, Sandy Nelson Ph.D., All Rights Reserved